Singer Miley Cyrus, former President Bill Clinton and talk show host Ellen DeGeneres are among the celebrities who’ve adopted a plant-based diet. Athlete Novak Djokovic, who recently won the men’s singles at this year’s Wimbledon tennis tournament, is the latest celeb catching waves over his plant diet.

There are several well-known factors that contribute to aging: smoking, stress, sun exposure and genetics, among them. But what you may not realize is what you put on your plate can also cause you to look beyond your year. 

Rebecca Williamson, a registered dietitian at Indiana Regional Medical Center, has spent much of her career making sure folks eat so their hearts are healthier. As with most things in life, moderation is the key. But there’s more to keep in mind.

Creating a balanced diet may prove more challenging than you think. Despite all the regulations and labels, a lot of the process gets lost in translation from farm to plate. When dealing with a wide-scale output like school cafeterias, finding that balance is even more difficult, especially when it relates to the impressionable, growing bodies of our next generation.

Whether you like to graze all day at the office or eat simply out of boredom, it can be tough to make healthy snack choices when you’re sitting at a desk, especially if you’re limited to a potato chip-filled vending machine, a co-worker’s candy jar or a nearby fast food restaurant.

The freezer section is a grocery store favorite — from frozen dinners to frosty desserts, it’s brimming with quick, affordable and delicious items. However, for some, consuming frozen products that contain dairy can lead to stomach issues and discomfort. For those who try to cut out ice cream and other cheesy entrees, don’t let that stop you from stocking up on microwave-ready delights while grocery shopping. We’ve rounded up some non-dairy and low-dairy favorites.

Let’s be honest. It’s easier to eat healthy when there are loads of delicious, freshly harvested fruits and vegetables available. In Ontario County, that kind of choice is only available for half the year. During the throes of winter, when sunshine is a rare commodity and warmer temperatures exist only in dreams, accessing fresh produce can be challenging.

It’s autumn, and the markets are filled with a harvest of carrots, parsnips beets and turnips, loaded with fiber and vitamin C. But how do you eat these rich root vegetables? Chef Jeffory McLean, of the New York Wine and Culinary Institute, offers some tips on buying and preparing seasonal root vegetables, just in time for comfort food.

The dilemma is all too familiar: It’s Monday morning, and you walk into your office to see someone has left a big box of donuts in the break room. Then, your coworker tells you there will be cake later, for yet another birthday celebration.