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Gyms and fitness centers across the U.S. are closed amidst the coronavirus outbreak, but there are many exercises that can be done at home to help people who are sheltering and maintain their fitness goals. Some gyms are even offering free live-streaming classes.

Staying at home during the coronavirus outbreak can help you avoid contracting the potentially deadly pathogen. Arming your immune system and creating a natural shield by eating foods rich in essential vitamins, minerals and antioxidants can help you fight off an infection, whether it is COVID-19 or other viruses and bacterium.

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While there are some foods that are believed to boost immunity, the most important thing you can do to try and boost your immune system now (and always) is to focus on your overall health:

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In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic and the ever-increasing number of confirmed cases and deaths in the United States, people are starting — if they haven’t already — to change their daily routines and behaviors to which they were accustomed.

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The societal response to the Covid-19 outbreak in the United States has led to most people practicing social distancing, and large segments of some states’ populations essentially in social isolation. Spending more time than usual indoors and away from social situations, and the lack of facetime with friends is something many people are struggling with. Time alone without that social outlet is for some people new, uncomfortable and even scary.

With the current coronavirus outbreak going on around the world, many employees are being forced to work from home to support “social distancing.” While this may come easy for some companies or employees, others might not be used to this new work environment.

Face-to-face social interaction reduces the risk of depression in older adults. As we focus on social distancing and quarantines globally, we all need to check in with our mental health.

With the current coronavirus outbreak going on around the world, many employees are being forced to work from home to support “social distancing.” While this may come easy for some companies or employees, others might not be used to this new work environment.

You’ve likely read a lot about the coronavirus or talked about it with friends or co-workers. It’s been on almost every major news outlet website, newspaper or TV station in the last few months. The coronavirus was first detected in China, and it’s now been detected in about 60 locations internationally, including the U.S., according to the Centers and Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

You’ve reached the significant milestone of retirement. Although you might be out of the workforce, that doesn’t mean you can’t splurge a little and treat yourself to a vacation — and still stay active. After all, retirement is a great time to travel the world and visit certain spots you’ve always wanted to see in person.

It’s time to face the facts: The incessant noise of modern life never seems to stop. It also seems that persistent and loud environmental noise — traffic, construction, urban racket and even war may cause or contribute to cardiovascular problems.

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There’s no shortage of medical information on the internet; so, when it comes to men and prostate cancer, how do you separate myth from fact? What about dated and current information?

It’s a no-brainer that exercise and physical activity benefits our bodies in countless ways. But for parents, it can sometimes be a challenge to get the kids off the couch or out of their bedrooms, especially in today’s tablet-obsessed and streaming-television-filled world of technology.

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The societal response to the Covid-19 outbreak in the United States has led to most people practicing social distancing, and large segments of some states’ populations essentially in social isolation. Spending more time than usual indoors and away from social situations, and the lack of facetime with friends is something many people are struggling with. Time alone without that social outlet is for some people new, uncomfortable and even scary.

With the current coronavirus outbreak going on around the world, many employees are being forced to work from home to support “social distancing.” While this may come easy for some companies or employees, others might not be used to this new work environment.

Face-to-face social interaction reduces the risk of depression in older adults. As we focus on social distancing and quarantines globally, we all need to check in with our mental health.

With the current coronavirus outbreak going on around the world, many employees are being forced to work from home to support “social distancing.” While this may come easy for some companies or employees, others might not be used to this new work environment.

COVID-19 is a new disease and we are learning more about it every day. Older adults are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Most people who get sick with COVID-19 will have only mild illness and should recover at home.* Care at home can help stop the spread of COVID-19 and help protect people who are at risk for ge…

You’ve likely read a lot about the coronavirus or talked about it with friends or co-workers. It’s been on almost every major news outlet website, newspaper or TV station in the last few months. The coronavirus was first detected in China, and it’s now been detected in about 60 locations internationally, including the U.S., according to the Centers and Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

You’ve reached the significant milestone of retirement. Although you might be out of the workforce, that doesn’t mean you can’t splurge a little and treat yourself to a vacation — and still stay active. After all, retirement is a great time to travel the world and visit certain spots you’ve always wanted to see in person.

It’s time to face the facts: The incessant noise of modern life never seems to stop. It also seems that persistent and loud environmental noise — traffic, construction, urban racket and even war may cause or contribute to cardiovascular problems.

  • Updated

There’s no shortage of medical information on the internet; so, when it comes to men and prostate cancer, how do you separate myth from fact? What about dated and current information?

It’s a no-brainer that exercise and physical activity benefits our bodies in countless ways. But for parents, it can sometimes be a challenge to get the kids off the couch or out of their bedrooms, especially in today’s tablet-obsessed and streaming-television-filled world of technology.

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Spring and summer are on the horizon, and that means people are going to be making their way back outside and be under the sun more frequently. Just like the skin, the eyes can be as vulnerable to damage from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. The eyes are often overlooked when people think of UV protection. Here’s what you need to know about how to keep your sight safe the next time you’re catching some rays at the beach, out for a run-in park, or just about anywhere.

As we all know, America, and the world, is facing an unprecedented time right now. Many people are working from home or out of work completely, and many schools are in their first week of closures. This means that parents and students are experiencing a time that they likely haven’t before, in which the whole family is home together all day, every day.

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For many women, giving birth to a baby may trigger an assortment of emotions, including joy, excitement, anxiety and even fear. But it could also lead to something you may not expect. Most new mothers experience a milder form of depression, sometimes commonly called “the baby blues,” after childbirth. Other new moms, however, can experience a more severe, long-lasting form called postpartum depression.